Realignment in the aftermath of war: The League of Red Cross Societies, the Australian Red Cross and its Junior Red Cross in the 1920s

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

During the interwar period, one of the programmes that engendered considerable
interest within the Red Cross Movement was the Junior Red Cross. Described
as 'one of the best guarantees for the permanence of the peacetime work of the
Red Cross Society', the Junior Red Cross tapped into a new and prescribed role
that children and youth could play within Red Cross into the future. 1 Youth were
viewed optimistically by sections of the Red Cross, arguing that they could play
a role in leading the world out 'of the dark jungle of old passions between nation
and nation'. 2 The links that could be established between the various national
Junior Red Cross programmes concerning international friendship and good will
would create an awareness of other nationalities and cultures, and improve international relations through the establishment of a global children's network.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Red Cross Movement
Subtitle of host publicationMyths, practices and turning points
EditorsNeville Wylie, Melanie Oppenheimer, James Crossland
Place of PublicationManchester
PublisherManchester University Press
Chapter8
Pages130-147
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781526133533, 978-1-5261-3353-3
ISBN (Print)9781526133519, 978-1-5261-3351-9
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Publication series

NameHumanitarianism: Key Debates and New Approaches
PublisherManchester University Press

Keywords

  • Red Cross Movement
  • Humanitarianism
  • Disasterrelief
  • Charity
  • Philanthropy

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