Reducing Marine Biofilm Formation via Surface Modification: Supporting Seagrass Restoration

James Paterson, S Ogden, EJ Tanner, K Benkendorff, SJ Quinton

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    The formation of biofilms on man-made surfaces is a common and problematic occurrence in the marine environment. In addition to man-made surfaces, biofilm formation can also appear on naturally occurring marine surfaces, such as sediment and rock substrates and plants. The commencement of a seagrass restoration project in South Australian waters has developed an approach to utilise natural hessian material to assist in seagrass recruitment.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAbstract Book
    Subtitle of host publicationFirst EMBO Conference on Aquatic Microbial Ecology – SAME13
    EditorsS Amalfitano, M Coci, G Corno, GM Luna
    PublisherMicrob&CO
    Pages267-267
    Number of pages1
    ISBN (Print)9788890971419
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    Event13th Symposium on Aquatic Microbial Ecology: The First EMBO Conference on Aquatic Microbial Ecology - Congress Palace, Stresa, Italy
    Duration: 8 Sep 201313 Sep 2013
    https://www.frontiersin.org/events/SAME13_(13th_Symposium_on_Aquatic_Microbial_Ecology)/1741 (Conference overview)

    Conference

    Conference13th Symposium on Aquatic Microbial Ecology
    Abbreviated titleSAME13
    Country/TerritoryItaly
    CityStresa
    Period8/09/1313/09/13
    OtherThis symposium will be organized in the tradition of the very successful SAME meetings, coupling the outstanding scientific level of lectures and communications to the unique convivial atmosphere of SAME. We have not defined one conference theme, in order to enlarge as much as possible the coverage of the different advances in aquatic microbial ecology achieved in the last years, as well as the most exotic perspectives.
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