Renewable energy use and potential in remote central Australia

Yiheyis Maru, Supriya Mathew, Digby Race, Bruno Spandonide

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    High electricity prices coupled with a high level of energy use by Australian households is likely to exert more pressure on low-income households, raising concerns about whether Australia’s high standard of living can be sustained, particularly for disadvantaged indigenous people living in remote Australia. Australia’s average residential electricity prices have recently been higher than many other developed countries such as Japan, United States of America, Canada and others in the European Union (EC, 2014; Mount, 2012). In addition, Australia’s energy consumption per capita is much higher than most other countries, including more than ten times that of some rapidly developing countries, such as India (EIA (US Energy Information Agency), 2011).

    Remote Australia covers more than 86% of the surface area of the continent but is only sparsely populated by 2.3% of the Australian population. Remote Australia is quite different from other parts of Australia, with both rich opportunities and considerable challenges...
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationGeothermal, Wind and Solar Energy Applications in Agriculture and Aquaculture
    EditorsJochen Bundschuh, Guangnan Chen, D. Chandrasekharam, Janusz Piechocki
    Place of PublicationLondon
    PublisherCRC Press
    Chapter5
    Pages97-114
    Number of pages18
    Editionfirst
    ISBN (Electronic)9781315158969
    ISBN (Print)9781138029705
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

    Publication series

    NameSustainable Energy Developments
    PublisherCRC Press
    Number13

    Keywords

    • Renewable energy
    • Remote Australia
    • Agriculture
    • Central Australia

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