Reply

Raffaella Bianucci, Antonio Perciaccante, Francesco Maria Galassi

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

Abstract

Refers to: Alessandra Foscati, "Historian questions paleopathological diagnosis in a work of art", Journal of Vascular Surgery, Volume 70, Issue 2, August 2019, Page 657.

The multidisciplinary reassessment of diseases of the past offers paleopathologists and historians the possibility of shedding light on the antiquity of pathological conditions.1 Although a full discussion of this specific topic would require a different venue and a lengthier format, we appreciate input and suggestions from both the scientific and literary milieux. Regarding the chronology of the miracle, we agree that it occurred after ad 526 to 530, which corresponds to the foundation of Cosmas and Damian's church in Rome. Nonetheless, we disagree with the rest of the argumentation. Dr Foscati questions the use of Colleoni's reference,2 claiming that the “text was written much more recently than the events chronicled, it cannot be said to reflect a late antique mentality.”

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)657-659
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019

Keywords

  • Correspondence
  • Paleopathology
  • History
  • Archaeology
  • Cosmas and Damian
  • Late Antiquity
  • Middle Ages
  • black leg
  • Jacobus da Varagine
  • Golden Legend

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