Residential provision for people with intellectual disabilities in England, Wales and Scotland

Eric Emerson, Chris Hatton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nature and extent of residential provision for people with intellectual disabilities in 1991 in England, Scotland and Wales is described. In summary, the data from the OPCS Census suggest that: (1) there existed substantial regional and national variation in the extent of residential provision for people with intellectual disabilities in England, Scotland and Wales; (2) overall, the level of provision was significantly lower than Department of Health targets for 1991 of 1.55 places per 1000 of the adult population; (3) the majority of people with intellectual disabilities were living in relatively large-scale congregate care settings; (4) the majority of residents were younger and middle-aged adults, although a significant minority were either late adolescents or very elderly; (5) young black men were significantly more likely to be placed in residential provision than their peers from other ethnic groups; (6) young Asian men, young Chinese/Other men and young Asian women were significantly less likely to be placed in residential provision than their peers from other ethnic groups; (7) rates of employment and marriage among residents were markedly lower than for the general population. The results are discussed in relation to national policy aims and existing and future demand for residential provision.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalJOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1998
Externally publishedYes

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