Rethinking sustainability in childhood obesity prevention: Learning from South Australia's Obesity Prevention and Lifestyle Program

Michelle Jones, Fiona Verity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Increases in childhood obesity have occurred across a relatively short time-period, yet childhood obesity prevention is a longer-term game. Programs have only identified population-level changes after twelve years of on-the-ground activity (Romon et al., 2009). Community stakeholders can impact the success of public health interventions (Ganter et al., 2016; Lee et al., 2020) and they have been identified as a critical success factor for program sustainability (Schell et al., 2013). Qualitative research with stakeholders (n= 59) provides their insights and understandings of the sustainability of OPAL, a South Australian childhood obesity prevention program. Stakeholders identified activities that they thought contributed to improved sustainability of action such as embedding obesity prevention into organisational policy and plans; and installation of infrastructure within communities to modify physical environments. In contrast there was little appetite for sustaining OPAL or other formulations of a childhood obesity prevention program. This research has implications for planning and implementation of community-based childhood obesity prevention initiatives when considering the balance of the portfolio of activities for implementation.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberdaab080
Number of pages14
JournalHealth Promotion International
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Jun 2021

Keywords

  • childhood obesity prevention
  • Sustainability
  • Qualitative data analysis
  • community-based intervention

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