Reviving Community Spirit: Furthering the Sustainable, Historical and Economic Role of Fish Weirs and Traps

Bill Jeffery

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Stone wall fish weirs and traps were once an important means for inland and coastal communities to catch fish. In many places the weirs and traps have been left to deteriorate and other more productive but less sustainable practices have taken their place. It was considered that they have fulfilled their historical and economic role and it was the loss of community spirit that has contributed to their decline. A recent survey in Yap, Federated States of Micronesia found a diverse and extensive number of fish weirs and traps, and a community keen to restore and reinvigorate their associated cultural practices and community spirit. The paper draws on comparative data from other places of the world to investigate weirs and traps, and to see if a similar revival could be observed. Of importance was a need to highlight the value of pursuing this type of research for contemporary communities and maritime archaeological practitioners in the current international management framework for underwater cultural heritage.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)29-57
    Number of pages29
    JournalJournal of Maritime Archaeology
    Volume8
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

    Keywords

    • Federated States of Micronesia
    • Fish trap
    • Fish weir
    • Palau
    • Pohnpei
    • South Africa
    • Taiwan
    • Tanzania
    • Underwater cultural heritage
    • Yap

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