Role of red meat and resistant starch in pro-mutagenic adduct formation, MGMT repair, thymic lymphoma and intestinal tumourigenesis in Msh2 deficient mice

Jean Winter, Ying Hu, Graeme Young, Maija Kohonen-Corish, Richard Le Leu

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Red meat may increase promutagenic lesions in the colon. Resistant starch (RS) can reduce these lesions and chemically induced colon tumours in rodents. Msh2 is a mismatch repair (MMR) protein, recognising unrepaired promutagenic adducts for removal. We determined if red meat and/or RS modulated DNA adducts or oncogenesis in Msh2-deficient mice. A total of 100 Msh2-/- and 60 wild-type mice consumed 1 of 4 diets for 6 months: control, RS, red meat and red meat + RS. Survival time, aberrant crypt foci (ACF), colon and small intestinal tumours, lymphoma, colonic O6-methyl-2-deoxyguanosine (O6MeG) adducts, methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) and cell proliferation were examined. In Msh2-/- mice, red meat enhanced survival compared to control (p < 0.01) and lowered total tumour burden compared to RS (p < 0.167). Msh2-/- mice had more ACF than wild-type mice (p < 0.014), but no colon tumours developed. Msh2-/- increased cell proliferation (p < 0.001), lowered DNA O6MeG adducts (p < 0.143) and enhanced MGMT protein levels (p < 0.001) compared to wild-type mice, with RS supplementation also protecting against DNA adducts (p < 0.01). No link between red meat-induced promutagenic adducts and risk for colorectal cancer was observed after 6 months' feeding. Colonic epithelial changes after red meat and RS consumption with MMR deficiency will differ from normal epithelial cells.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)299-313
    Number of pages15
    JournalJournal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics
    Volume7
    Issue number4-6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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