Screening and Management Practices for Polyoma (BK) Viremia and Nephropathy in Kidney Transplant Recipients From the Lands Down Under: Addressing the Unknowns and Rationale for a Multicenter Clinical Trial

Germaine Wong, Julie Marsh, Martin Howell, Wai H. Lim, Steve Chadban, Toby Coates, Carmel Hawley, Scott Campbell, Nicholas Larkins, Tom Snelling, Lachlan Allan, Armando Teixeira-Pinto, Donna Reidlinger, Kate Wyburn, Jonathan C. Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BK polyomavirus infection in transplanted kidneys that leads to BK virus–associated nephropathy (BKVAN) is an important cause of allograft loss and has limited treatment options.1 Recent data suggest that BK viremia affects approximately 10% of people within the first 12 months following kidney transplantation.2 Among recipients with BKVAN, the overall risk of allograft loss is substantially increased, estimated to be 50% within 5 years of diagnosis. Geographic variation in the rates of BK infection also has been recognized. Depending on local epidemiology and immunosuppression practices, the prevalence of viruria, viremia, and histological features of BKVAN is reported to be between 35% and 40%, 12% and 15%, and 3% and 8%, respectively.3
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1777-1780
Number of pages4
JournalKidney International Reports
Volume5
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

Bibliographical note

This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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