Self-reported physical health, mental health and participation in health-promoting behaviours of rural and urban South Australian adults with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD)

Kate Fennell, Narelle Berry, Rosie Meng, Carlene Wilson, Jim Dollman, Richard Woodman, Bogda Koczwara, Robyn Clark

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

    Abstract

    Introduction: Rural people with Cardiovascular Disease
    (CVD) are at risk of poorer outcomes. However, little isknown
    about their wellbeing post-discharge from specialist cardiac
    care.
    Objectives: To determine whether self-reported health,
    mental health and health-promoting behaviour differs
    between rural and urban adults with a history of CVD.
    Methods: Weighted, representative data were collected
    from adults between 1 January 2010 and 1 June 2015 via
    the South Australian Monitoring and Surveillance System
    (SAMSS).
    Results: Within the survey population (n=36,437), 4,677
    participants (12.8%) reported having a CVD condition; metro
    10.2% vs. rural 2.6%; 43.1% ≥ 65 years old; mean BMI (metro
    27.9 vs. rural 29.2, p≤0.001). After controlling for survey year,
    gender, age, education, income and SEIFA (Socio-Economic
    Indexes for Areas), rural CVD participants were significantly
    more likely to experience poor health and comorbidities (diabetes,
    cancer, COPD, arthritis) relative to their urban CVD
    participants. Urban CVD participants were more likely to
    report suicidal ideation, distress and dissatisfaction with life.
    Rural CVD participants had significantly greater risk of harm
    from alcohol and smoking and were significantly less likely
    to engage in sufficient levels of physical activity. They were
    more also likely to travel over 100km to access specialist
    cardiac services [Rural 11.50 (8.35, 15.84)] vs. (Urban 2.12
    [1.38, 328]) p≤ 0.001) but had greater trust in their communities.
    There was no significant difference between groups
    for intake of fruit and vegetables (both groups were below
    recommendations).
    Conclusions: Rural people with CVD have greater burden
    of poor health, comorbidities, alcohol harm and smoking
    than their urban counterparts and are less likely to engage in
    sufficient levels of physical activity.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)S321-S322
    Number of pages1
    JournalHeart, Lung and Circulation
    Volume24
    Issue numberSuppl_2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    Event64th Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ) Annual Scientific Meeting and the International Society for Heart Research Australasian Section Annual Scientific Meeting - Adelaide, Australia
    Duration: 4 Aug 20167 Aug 2016
    Conference number: 64th

    Keywords

    • self- reported health
    • rural
    • urban
    • Cardiovascular Disease (CVD)

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