Sensitive domains of self-concept in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): Further evidence for a multidimensional model of OCD

Guy Doron, Michael Kyrios, Richard Moulding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aspects of self-concept have been implicated in recent empirical and theoretical investigations of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). This article extends previous theory and research by investigating the proposal that specific self-structures may be linked with OCD [e.g., Doron, G., & Kyrios, M. (2005). Obsessive–compulsive disorder: a review of possible specific internal representations within a broader cognitive theory. Clinical Psychology Review, 25, 415–432]. In particular, it was hypothesized that individuals who value the domains of morality, job and scholastic competence, and social acceptability, but who feel incompetent in these domains (i.e., “sensitive” domains of self), would hold a greater level of OC-related beliefs and display more OC-symptoms. The study was performed in 198 non-clinical participants, using a multidimensional measure of self-concept. As predicted, it was found that sensitivity in the four domains was related to higher levels of OC-related beliefs. Sensitivity in the domains of morality, job competence and social acceptability also related to higher levels of OC-symptoms. Further, these findings were generally maintained when controlling for global self-worth. Based on these results, it is argued that sensitivity of self-concept may be associated with OC cognitions and phenomena. Implications for theory and treatment are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-444
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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