Simultaneous Colonic Pressure Waves in Children and Young Adults with Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: Artefact or Colonic Physiology?

Richard Leibbrandt, Samuel Nurko, S. Mark Scott, Phil G. Dinning

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Abstract

Background: Simultaneous pressure waves (SPW) spanning all recording sites in colonic manometry studies have been described as a potential biomarker of normal gas transit and extrinsic neural reflexes. In pediatric studies utilizing combined antroduodenal and colonic manometry, it was noted that most colonic SPWs appeared to also span all sensors in the gastric and small bowel regions. This suggests that a proportion of colonic SPWs may represent an artefact caused by forces extrinsic to the colon. Our aim was to characterize colonic SPWs and determine how many of these spanned most of the digestive tract. 

Methods: In 39 combined high-resolution antroduodenal and colonic manometry traces from 27 pediatric patients, we used our purpose-built software to identify all SPWs that spanned either (i) all recording sites in the digestive tract or (ii) those restricted to the colon. 

Results: A total of 14,565 SPWs were identified (364 ± 316 SPWs/study), with 14,550 (99.9%) spanning the entire antroduodenal and colonic recording sites. Only 15 SPWs (0.1% of the total) were restricted to the colon (all in one recording).

Conclusions: Based on these findings, we suggest that, in pediatric studies, SPWs should not form part of any diagnostic criteria, as these events appear to be an artefact caused by factors outside the colon (abdominal strain, body motion).

Original languageEnglish
Article number5808
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume12
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2023

Keywords

  • artefact
  • colon
  • constipation
  • manometry
  • pediatric
  • simultaneous pressure waves

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