Site familiarity affects escape behaviour of the eastern chipmunk, Tamias striatus

M. F. Clarke, K. Burke Da Silva, H. Lair, R. Pocklington, D. L. Kramer, R. L. McLaughlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chipmunks never used their burrow as a refuge unless a chase was initiated within 2.5 m of the burrow entrance. The final refuge was commonly farther than the burrow entrance. Chipmunks were most likely to take refuge in holes other than their burrow when chased within their home range, whereas they were most likely to flee up trees when chased outside their home range. Chipmunks released within their home range (10 m from burrow) took only half as much time and travelled only half as far to reach a refuge as they did when released outside their normal home range (100 m from burrow). However, there was no effect of distance on time and distance to a refuge within the home range (1.3-17 m). -from Authors

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)533-537
Number of pages5
JournalOikos
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1993
Externally publishedYes

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