Sleep Apnea Multilevel Surgery (SAMS) trial protocol: A multicenter randomized clinical trial of upper airway surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea who have failed continuous positive airway pressure

A. Simon Carney, Nick A. Antic, Peter G. Catcheside, Ching Li Chai-Coetzer, Peter A. Cistulli, Billingsley Kaambwa, Stuart G. MacKay, Alison J. Pinczel, Edward M. Weaver, Richard J. Woodman, Charmaine M. Woods, R. Doug McEvoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious and costly public health problem. The main medical treatment, continuous positive airway pressure, is efficacious when used, but poorly tolerated in up to 50% of patients. Upper airway reconstructive surgery is available when medical treatments fail but randomized trial evidence supporting its use is limited. This protocol details a randomized controlled trial designed to assess the clinical effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of a multilevel upper airway surgical procedure for OSA.

Methods: A prospective, parallel-group, open label, randomized, controlled, multicenter clinical trial in adults with moderate or severe OSA who have failed or refused medical therapies. Six clinical sites in Australia randomly allocated participants in a 1:1 ratio to receive either an upper airway surgical procedure consisting of a modified uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and minimally invasive tongue volume reduction, or to continue with ongoing medical management, and followed them for 6 months.

Results: Primary outcomes: Difference between groups in baseline-adjusted 6 month OSA severity (apnea-hypopnea index) and subjective sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale). Secondary outcomes: Other OSA symptoms (e.g. snoring and objective sleepiness), other polysomnography parameters (e.g. arousal index and 4% oxygen desaturation index), quality of life, 24 hr ambulatory blood pressure, adverse events, and adherence to ongoing medical therapies (medical group).

Conclusions: The Sleep Apnea Multilevel Surgery (SAMS) trial is of global public health importance for testing the effectiveness and safety of a multilevel surgical procedure for patients with OSA who have failed medical treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberzsz056
Number of pages8
JournalSLEEP
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Surgery
  • Tongue reduction
  • UPPP

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