Smoking and Adverse Outcomes in Patients With CKD: The Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP)

Natalie Staplin, Richard Haynes, William Herrington, Christina Reith, Alan Cass, Bengt Fellstrom, Lixin Jiang, Bertram Kasiske, Vera Krane, Adeera Levin, Robert Walker, Christoph Wanner, David Wheeler, Martin Landray, Colin Baigent, Jonathan Emberson, Charles Tomson, Jonathan Craig, Bruce Neal, Lai HooiLawrence Agodoa, Mike Gaziano, Ziad Massy, Bo Feldt-Rasmussen, Udom Krairittichai, Vuddidhej Ophascharoensuk, Hallvard Holdaas, Vladimir Tesar, Andrzej Wiecek, Diederick Grobbee, Dick de Zeeuw, Carola Gronhagen-Riska, Tanaji Dasgupta, David Lewis, Marion Mafham, William Majoni, Karl Wallendszus, Richard Grimm, Terje Pedersen, Jonathan Tobert, Jane Armitage, Alex Baxter, Christopher Bray, Yiping Chen, Zhengming Chen, Michael Hill, Carol Knott, Sarah Parish, David Simpson, Peter Sleight, Alan Young, Rory Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The absolute and relative importance of smoking to vascular and nonvascular outcomes in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well its relevance to kidney disease progression, is uncertain. Study Design Observational study. Setting & Participants 9,270 participants with CKD enrolled in SHARP. Predictor Baseline smoking status (current, former, and never). Outcomes Vascular events, site-specific cancer, ESRD, rate of change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and cause-specific mortality. Results At baseline, 1,243 (13%) participants were current smokers (median consumption, 10 cigarettes/day); 3,272 (35%), former smokers; and 4,755 (51%), never smokers. Median follow-up was 4.9 years. Vascular event rates were 36% higher for current than never smokers (2,317 events; relative risk [RR], 1.36; 95% CI, 1.19-1.55), reflecting increases in both atherosclerotic (RR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.26-1.76) and nonatherosclerotic (RR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.05-1.50) events. Cancer was 37% higher among current smokers (632 events; RR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.07-1.76), with the biggest RRs for lung (RR, 9.31; 95% CI, 4.37-19.83) and upper aerodigestive tract (RR, 4.87; 95% CI, 2.10-11.32) cancers. For 6,245 patients not receiving dialysis at baseline, ESRD incidence did not differ significantly between current and never smokers (2,141 events; RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.89-1.17), nor did estimated rate of change in eGFR (current smokers, −1.77 ± 0.14 [SE]; never smokers, −1.70 ± 0.07 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year). All-cause mortality was 48% higher among current smokers (2,257 events; RR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.30-1.70), with significant increases in vascular (RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.07-1.69) and nonvascular (RR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.34-1.91) causes of death, especially cancer (RR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.58-3.40) and respiratory (RR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.51-3.35) mortality. Limitations Smoking status not assessed during follow-up. Conclusions In this study of patients with CKD, smoking significantly increased the risks for vascular and nonvascular morbidity and mortality, but was not associated with kidney disease progression. The associations with vascular and neoplastic disease are in keeping with those observed in the general population and are likely modifiable by cessation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)371-380
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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