Social comparisons across nations: Variables relating to the subjective evaluation of national achievement and to personal and collective self-esteem

N. T. Feather

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract


    This study investigated correlates of the degree to which participants favoured the products and achievements of their own nation. Three samples of undergraduate students in Adelaide, Australia compared their country with 30 other countries in regard to either economic development (Sample 1, N = 113), cultural achievement (Sample 2, N = 104), or scientific/lechnological achievement (Sample 3, N = 104). They also completed a general measure of ingroup bias (national favouritism) and measures of national identity, national identification, and personal and collective self-esteem. Results showed that ratings across countries were correlated with economic, social, and cultural objective indicators. Favouring own nation over others in general was linked to national identity (Australia or other), national identification, and to cultural and scientific/technological advantage, but not to economic advantage. Results for the esteem-related variables varied across the three samples, but there was some evidence that collective self-esteem improved prediction to national favouritism beyond personal self-esteem. Results were consistent with implications from social identity theory concerning ingroup favouritism, and with the assumption that comparisons at the national level are also influenced by objective information about nations.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)53-63
    Number of pages11
    JournalAustralian Journal of Psychology
    Volume48
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 1996

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Social comparisons across nations: Variables relating to the subjective evaluation of national achievement and to personal and collective self-esteem'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this