Social Groups and Children's Intergroup Attitudes: Can School Norms Moderate the Effects of Social Group Norms?

Drew Nesdale, Michael Lawson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    50 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The effects of social group norms (inclusion vs. exclusion vs. exclusion-plus-relational aggression) and school norms (inclusion vs. no norm) on 7- and 10-year-old children's intergroup attitudes were examined. Children (n=383) were randomly assigned to a group with an inclusion or exclusion norm, and to 1 of the school norm conditions. Findings indicated that children's out-group attitudes reflected their group's norm but, with increasing age, they liked their in-group less, and the out-group more, if the group had an exclusion norm. The school inclusion norm instigated more positive attitudes toward out-group members, but it did not moderate or extinguish contrary group norms. The use of school norms to counteract the effects of children's social group norms is discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1594-1606
    Number of pages13
    JournalChild Development
    Volume82
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Social Groups and Children's Intergroup Attitudes: Can School Norms Moderate the Effects of Social Group Norms?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this