Some gain for a small investment: An economic evaluation of an exercise program for people living in residential aged care

Miia Rahja, Kim-Huong Nguyen, Dannielle Post, Gaynor Parfitt, Megan Corlis, Tracy Comans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a 12-week Exercise Physiology (EP) program for people living in a residential aged care facility. Methods: A within-study pre- and postintervention design to calculate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios per quality-adjusted life years gained. A health service provider perspective was used. Results: Fifty-nine participants enrolled in a 12-week program. The program cost was A$514.30 per resident. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of A$64 000, the likelihood of being cost-effective of the program is approximately 60%, due to a small increase in participants’ quality of life, as reported by care staff. The model showed great variance, depending on who rated the participants’ quality of life outcomes. Conclusion: It is uncertain that a 12-week EP program is cost-effective based on the evidence of the current trial. However, it appears that a low-cost program can produce small improvements for residents in care facilities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e116-e124
Number of pages9
JournalAustralasian Journal on Ageing
Volume40
Issue number2
Early online date1 Nov 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cognitive decline
  • economic evaluation
  • exercise program
  • physical function
  • residential aged care

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