Sovereignty performances, sovereignty testings: The Queen's currency and imperial pedagogies on Australia's south-eastern settler frontiers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In 1843 near the town of Geelong, in the Port Phillip Bay area of south-eastern Australia, William Adeney, a young man in his twenties and a recent emigrant from England, met a group of Aboriginal people near a squatter’s run. Later that day, he recorded the encounter in his diary:

Met some natives today and had a short yarn with them. Seeing that I looked inquisitively at them they asked me for a sixpence ... the woman said ‘give me sixpence’ so I took one from my pocket and asked whose head was on it when one of the men replied ‘white [woman]’.1
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMistress of everything
Subtitle of host publicationQueen Victoria in Indigenous worlds
EditorsSarah Carter, Maria Nugent
Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
PublisherManchester University Press
Chapter8
Pages187-209
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9781526100320
ISBN (Print)9781784991401
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameStudies in Imperialism
PublisherManchester University Press

Keywords

  • Queen Victoria
  • Indigenous Australia
  • Indigenous worlds
  • imperial pedagogies

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  • Cite this

    Edmonds, P. (2016). Sovereignty performances, sovereignty testings: The Queen's currency and imperial pedagogies on Australia's south-eastern settler frontiers. In S. Carter, & M. Nugent (Eds.), Mistress of everything: Queen Victoria in Indigenous worlds (pp. 187-209). (Studies in Imperialism). Manchester University Press.