Speeded induction under uncertainty: The influence of multiple categories and feature conjunctions

Ben Newell, Helen Paton, Brett K. Hayes, Oren Dennis Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When people are uncertain about the category membership of an item (e.g., Is it a dog or a dingo?), research shows that they tend to rely only on the dominant or most likely category when making inductions (e.g., How likely is it to befriend me?). An exception has been reported using speeded induction judgments where participants appeared to use information from multiple categories to make inductions (Verde, Murphy, & Ross, 2005). In two speeded induction studies, we found that participants tended to rely on the frequency with which features co-occurred when making feature predictions, independently of category membership. This pattern held whether categories were considered implicitly (Experiment 1) or explicitly (Experiment 2) prior to feature induction. The results converge with other recent work suggesting that people often rely on feature conjunction information, rather than category boundaries, when making inductions under uncertainty.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)869-874
Number of pages6
JournalPsychonomic Bulletin and Review
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

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