Still not adult-like: Lexical stress contrastivity in word productions of eight- to eleven-year-olds

Joanne Arciuli, Kirrie J. Ballard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lexical stress is the contrast between strong and weak syllables within words. Ballard et al. (2012) examined the amount of stress contrastivity across adjacent syllables in word productions of typically developing three- to seven-year-olds and adults. Here, eight- to eleven-year-olds are compared with the adults from Ballard et al. using acoustic measurements of relative contrast in duration, peak intensity, and peak fundamental frequency of the vowels within the initial two syllables of each word. While eight- to eleven-year-olds are closer to adult-like stress contrastivity than three- to seven-year-olds, they are not yet adult-like in terms of the intensity contrast for words beginning with a weak syllable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1274-1288
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Child Language
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adult-like
  • Lexical stress
  • contrastivity
  • word production

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