Student Self-assessment and self-grading in Archaeology

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    Assessment is an important and necessary part of teaching and learning in the tertiary education sector. Boud and Falchikov have identified two key elements in any assessment decision - 'the identification of criteria or standards to be applied to one's work, and making of judgements about the extent to which work meets these criteria' (Boud and Falchikov, 1989:529). Self-assessment can include a wide range of practices which encourage students to think critically about what they are learning, to identify appropriate standards of performance (self-developed criteria) and to apply them to their own work (Boud 1986:1). Self-grading is only a limited aspect of self assessment but provides students with the opportunity to reflect on the quality of an individual piece of their work against a set of given, rather than self-developed, criteria.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationImproving University Teaching and Learning
    EditorsHalia Silins, Roz Murray-Harvey , Janice Orrell
    Place of PublicationBedford Park, SA
    PublisherFlinders University of South Australia
    Pages29-36
    Number of pages8
    VolumeIII
    ISBN (Print)0725807725
    Publication statusPublished - 1998
    EventGraduate Certificate in Tertiary Education Miniconference -
    Duration: 25 Nov 1997 → …

    Conference

    ConferenceGraduate Certificate in Tertiary Education Miniconference
    Period25/11/97 → …

    Keywords

    • Archaeology -- Study and teaching
    • Self-assessment
    • Self-grading
    • Higher education
    • Tertiary education
    • Students

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  • Cite this

    Staniforth, M. (1998). Student Self-assessment and self-grading in Archaeology. In H. Silins, R. Murray-Harvey , & J. Orrell (Eds.), Improving University Teaching and Learning (Vol. III, pp. 29-36). Flinders University of South Australia.