Surface chemical functionalities affect the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells in vitro

Xujie Liu, Qingling Feng, Akash Bachhuka, Krasimir Vasilev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) in vitro. Plasma polymerized films rich in amine (NH 2 ), carboxyl (COOH) and methyl (CH 3 ), were generated on hydroxyapatite (HAp) substrates. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The ability of different substrates to absorb proteins was evaluated. The results showed that substrates modified with hydrophilic functional group (COOH and NH 2 ) can absorb more proteins than these modified with more hydrophobic functional group (CH 3 ). The behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) cultured on different substrates was investigated in vitro: cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis was used to characterize cell proliferation, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis was used to characterize cell morphology and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis was used to account for differentiation. The results of this study demonstrated that the NH 2 modified surfaces encourage osteogenic differentiation; the COOH modified surfaces promote cell adhesion and spreading and the CH 3 modified surfaces have the lowest ability to induce osteogenic differentiation. These findings confirmed that the surface chemical states of biomaterials can affect the behavior of hASCs in vitro.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)473-479
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume270
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adipose-derived stem cell
  • Differentiation
  • Hydroxyapatite
  • Plasma polymerization
  • Surface modification

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