Swallowing biomechanics before and following multi-level upper airway surgery for obstructive sleep apnea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES: The effect of contemporary multi-level upper airway surgery for obstructive sleep apnea on swallowing is unclear. This study assessed the biomechanical swallowing function in participants with obstructive sleep apnea pre- and post-modified uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and coblation channeling of the tongue. METHODS: In this prospective, longitudinal study, adults diagnosed with moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea who underwent modified uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and coblation channeling of the tongue surgery had swallowing biomechanics assessed using high-resolution pharyngeal manometry and analyzed with swallowgateway.com. Symptomatic swallowing difficulty was evaluated using the Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (≥ 234). General linear mixed-model analysis was conducted to evaluate the difference pre- and post-modified uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and coblation channeling of the tongue. Data are presented as mean [95% confidence intervals]. RESULTS: High-resolution pharyngeal manometry assessments were conducted in 10 participants (7 men; median age 50 [interquartile range 36-65]) preoperatively and repeated postoperatively at 9 months [interquartile range 6-13]. Self-reported dysphagia was unchanged following surgery (Sydney Swallow Questionnaire =149 [53, 447] to 168 [54, 247]; P = .093). High-resolution pharyngeal manometry outcomes indicated reduced mesopharyngeal pressures (148 [135, 161] to 124 [112, 137] mm Hg s cm; P = .011), reduced hypopharyngeal pressures (113 [101, 125] to 93 [84, 102] mm Hg s cm; P = 0.011), and reduced upper esophageal sphincter relaxation pressure (5 [4, 6] to 2 [1,3] mm Hg; P = 0.001) but no change to velopharyngeal pressures (135 [123, 147] to 137 [117, 157] mm Hg s cm; P = .850) postsurgery. CONCLUSIONS: Modified uvulopalatopharyngoplasty may have less implications on the swallow mechanism than previously suspected. In contrast, the reduction in mesopharyngeal contractile pressures associated with coblation channeling of the tongue, although within normal limits, may affect bolus propulsion. Biomechanical alterations were insufficient to worsen self-reported swallowing function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1167-1176
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of clinical sleep medicine : JCSM : official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2022

Keywords

  • deglutition disorders
  • manometry
  • patient-reported outcome measures
  • sleep-disordered breathing
  • upper airway physiology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Swallowing biomechanics before and following multi-level upper airway surgery for obstructive sleep apnea'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this