Sympathetic noradrenergic neurons containing dynorphin but not neuropeptide Y innervate small cutaneous blood vessels of guinea-pigs

I. L. Gibbins, J. L. Morris

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    64 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We have used double-labelling immunofluorescence techniques and retrograde axonal transport of Fast Blue to characterize three populations of sympathetic noradrenergic neurons innervating blood vessels in the hairless skin of the cars and paws of guinea-pigs. Each population of neurons innervated a specific level of the vascular bed, and had a distinctive content of neuropeptides. Sympathetic noradrenergic neurons innervating large distributing arteries contained immunoreactivity to neuropeptide Y. Neurons innervating smaller cutaneous arteries contained immunoreactivity to prodynorphin-derived peptides in addition to neuropeptide Y. Finally, sympathetic neurons innervating the smallest arterioles, and arterio-venous anastomoses, contained immunoreactivity to prodynorphin-derived peptides, but had no detectable neuropeptide Y. Although the major form of dynorphin immunoreactivity in perivascular sympathetic axons was dynorphin A(1-8), immunoreactivity to both dynorphin A(1-8) and dynorphin A(1-17) occurred in the cell bodies of these neurons, suggesting that dynorphin A is processed during axonal transport to the terminals. The perivascular sympathetic neurons containing prodynorphin-derived peptides but not neuropeptide Y are most likely to be involved in the regulation of thermoregulatory cutaneous vascular circuits.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)137-149
    Number of pages13
    JournalJournal of the Autonomic Nervous System
    Volume29
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 1990

    Keywords

    • Neuropeptide Y
    • Opioid peptide
    • Sympathetic neuron
    • Vasculature

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