Temporal changes in medication use and disease management in old age: where does it all end?

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

An increased number of available medications, people requiring them, and concomitant disease states in one individual,inevitably lead to greater medication use at the population level. Pharmacoepidemiological studies in older adults have shown an increasing use of several classes of medications overtime [1–3]. In this issue of the journal, Gao et al.[4] investigate the temporal trends in the use of medications in older adults in England in two comparable cohorts participating in the Cognitive Function and Aging Study I (CFAS I,n= 7,359,period 1991–94) and the Cognitive Function and Aging Study II (CFAS II,n= 7,614, period 2008–11). Participants in both studies underwent similar structured interviews regarding the use of prescribed and over the counter medications, including their name, dose, frequency and quantity, as well as clinical and demographic characteristics.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)160-161
Number of pages2
JournalAge and Ageing
Volume47
Issue number2
Early online date22 Dec 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2018

Keywords

  • disease management
  • geriatric medicine
  • Medication use
  • older adults
  • pharmacoepidemiology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Temporal changes in medication use and disease management in old age: where does it all end?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this