Ten-session cognitive behaviour therapy for eating disorders: Outcomes from a pragmatic pilot study of Australian non-underweight clients.

Mia Pellizzer, Glenn Waller, Tracey Wade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ten-session cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT-T) for eating disorders is designed to reduce barriers to treatment, including cost, therapist expertise, and lengthy wait lists. The current study aimed to replicate the first case series, evaluating the effectiveness of CBT-T in a sample of non-underweight clients, delivered by trainee psychologists under expert supervision. Methods: CBT-T was delivered to 26 clients in an outpatient setting. Outcomes included eating disorder cognitions and behaviours, quality of life, and general psychopathology. Analyses adopted a completer and intention-to-treat approach to data analysis, using multi-level modelling. Results: Significant improvements were found for the majority of outcomes from baseline to post-treatment and at one- and three-month follow-up. Effect sizes at post-treatment and follow-up from baseline were typically medium to large. Conclusion: Results support the effectiveness of CBT-T as a treatment for non-underweight eating disorder clients. Results were also comparable to longer versions of CBT for eating disorders and to outcomes delivered by experienced therapists. Longer follow-ups and the use of randomised controlled trial designs are required to confirm the efficacy of CBT-T.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-132
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Psychologist
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2018

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ten-session cognitive behaviour therapy for eating disorders: Outcomes from a pragmatic pilot study of Australian non-underweight clients.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this