Test context affects recollection and familiarity ratings: Implications for measuring recognition experiences.

Cody Tousignant, Glen Bodner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The binary remember/know task requires participants to dichotomize their subjective recognition experiences into those with recollection and those only with familiarity. Many variables have produced dissociative effects on remember/know judgments. In contrast, having participants make independent recollection/familiarity ratings has consistently produced parallel effects, suggesting the dissociations may be artifacts of using binary judgments. Bodner and Lindsay (2003) reported a test-list context effect with binary judgments: Increased remembering but decreased knowing for a set of critical items tested with a set of less-memorable (vs. more-memorable) items. Here we report a parallel effect of test-list context on recollection and familiarity ratings, induced by a shift in response bias. We argue that independent ratings are preferable to binary judgments because they allow participants to directly report the co-occurrence of recollection and familiarity for each item. Implications for the measurement of self-reported recognition experiences, and for accounts of recognition memory, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)994-1000
Number of pages7
JournalConsciousness and Cognition
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

Keywords

  • Context effects
  • Independent ratings
  • Recognition memory
  • Recollection/familiarity
  • Remember/know

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