"That camera adds ten pounds!":Women's reactions to visual weight-related feedback and the role of trait body checking

Jennifer Mills, Bethany Shikatani, Marika Tiggemann, Sarah Hollitt

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In Study 1 women were randomly assigned to viewing: (1) no photo of themselves, (2) an accurate, full-body photo, (3) a photo modified to make them appear thinner than usual, or (4) a photo modified to make them appear heavier than usual. Measures of mood, state self-esteem, and body dissatisfaction were completed. There were no main effects of photo condition; participants were generally poor at perceiving weight change. The heavier that participants thought they looked in their photo as compared to usual, the worse their appearance self-esteem and body dissatisfaction. Study 2 replicated these results and found that participants with higher levels of trait body checking were more likely to report that they looked heavier than usual in the photo. Study 3 replicated these results and found that the correlation between body parts checking and how participants thought they looked in the photo held true even after controlling for appearance investment.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)516-526
    Number of pages11
    JournalBody Image
    Volume11
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2014

    Keywords

    • Body checking
    • Body image
    • Self-esteem
    • Weight feedback

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