'That psychological bulls**t': Surprising findings from community research are improving preparedness communication

Danielle Every, Amy Reynolds, Helen Keen-Dyer, Matt Dyer, Peta Miller-Rose, Joshua Trigg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Effective preparedness is often communicated as physical actions such as having a survival plan and an emergency kit or reinforcing, moving and clearing property. However, the physiological responses to an overwhelming threat can disrupt the best-laid preparations and plans. Psychological and emotional preparedness during the response phase of a disaster helps identify and manage fear to reduce the impacts on cognitive and behavioural functioning. Rates of psychological and emotional preparedness are generally lower than for physical preparedness. This presents particular challenges when communicating this type of risk. This paper reports on qualitative research with residents and agencies in south-east Queensland about what psychological and emotional preparedness means to them, what prevents people from engaging with this type of risk and how best to communicate it.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-61
Number of pages5
JournalAustralian Journal of Emergency Management
Volume33
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Queensland
  • Emotions--Psychological aspects
  • Emergency management--Planning
  • Disasters--Psychological aspects
  • Effective preparedness
  • psychological and emotional preparedness
  • psychological preparedness
  • emotional preparedness

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