The acquisition of communication skills by people with brain injury: Some comparisons with children with autism

Roger Rees, Michelle Bellon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This research identifies the extent to which different contexts shape and modify the language and behaviours of four people with acquired brain injury. Comparisons are made with factors which can influence the language acquisition of children with autism because it is postulated that children with autism also have a particular brain injury. The comparison does not end there as the criteria for effective management necessary to nourish the communication skills of both groups appears similar. The four contexts used to shape and evaluate the language of people with brain injury include their own home, a residential camp with maximum support and enriched activity, a post camp period with comparable support, followed by a return to their own home with very limited support. Measures of communication skills demonstrate the success of the enriched camp facility. This was characterised by planning, structured support, and expectation of success from the participants. Their motivation and ability to communicate generally far exceeded the communication skills that each person with brain injury demonstrated when organised activity and sustained support is not available.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)175-189
    Number of pages15
    JournalInternational Journal of Disability, Development and Education
    Volume49
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2002

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