The Anchor of the 3rd-Century-BC Ship from Kyrenia, Cyprus: a one-armed wooden anchor with a lead-filled stock

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    Abstract

    Since its excavation in the late 1960s, the Kyrenia ship has become a seminal component of the corpus of archaeological evidence related to late-Classical and early-Hellenistic Greek seafaring in the Eastern Mediterranean. The ship sank north-east of the town of Kyrenia, Cyprus, in the early-3rd century BC, c.295–285 (Katzev, 2005: 72). The remains of the ship itself, built some time between 315 and 305 BC, include c.75% of the structural members, along with elements of its rigging and sail, and fragments of a one-armed wooden anchor with a lead-filled stock.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)397-407
    Number of pages11
    JournalInternational Journal of Nautical Archaeology
    Volume41
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012

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