The assessment of obsessive-compulsive phenomena: psychometric and normative data on the Padua Inventory from an Australian non-clinical student sample

Michael Kyrios, Sunil Bhar, Daryl Wade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Padua Inventory (PI) is a measure of obsessive-compulsive phenomena, which is used in clinical and research settings. One reason for the PI's growing acceptance is the emergence of a good deal of evidence supporting the adequacy of its reliability, convergent validity, and evidence supporting the stability of its factor structure. However, there have been some concerns about its discriminant validity. The use of the PI in Australia has been limited by the lack of local normative data and information about its psychometric properties. The cross-national validation of the PI has both theoretical and practical implications, and could add further evidence for its adequacy as a measure of obsessive-compulsive phenomena. Results from the present study found that the PI exhibited a similar but not identical factor structure compared to previous studies, consistently good reliability, adequate convergent validity, and differences in normative data compared with previous studies. Overall, while one may not necessarily assume the generalisability of normative data across different cultural contexts, there is a good deal of consistency in the psychometric properties of the PI. However, there is a need to further demonstrate the PI's discriminant validity, particularly for the "Urges and Worries" subscale
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-95
Number of pages11
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • OCD patients
  • obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • normative systems
  • Australia

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