The Australian Assistance Plan and the Canadian Connection: Origins and Legacies

Melanie Oppenheimer, Carolyn Collins, Erik Eklund

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Within the context of the war on poverty and an acknowledgement of the wider global phenomenon of a ‘post-industrial society’, the Australian Labor Party under Gough Whitlam sought out a range of reforming and innovative social policy programs. This article explores the origins of one such program, the Australian Assistance Plan (AAP), and its connections, similarities and differences to the Canada Assistance Plan. Drawing on extensive archival and oral history sources, it offers a comparative analysis of both national programs, then outlines how international social planning and community development ideas, especially from Canada, infused the AAP and its predecessor, the Geelong Experiment.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)324-340
    Number of pages17
    JournalAustralian Historical Studies
    Volume49
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

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