“The Cure Has Killed Us All”: Dramatizing Medical Ethics through Zombie and Period Fiction Tropes in The New Deadwardians

Tully Barnett, Ben Kooyman

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    Abstract

    The figure of the zombie carries death and decay into a world obsessed with medical healing and health. Zombies, as they exist in contemporary popular culture, are an illness taken to its extreme, one that is highly infectious and cannot be healed. Moreover, tales of reanimated bodies, from Mary Shelleys Frankenstein (1818) through to The Walking Dead (comic 2003-; television 2010-) have long articulated topical concerns around medical science, scientific hubris, the abuse of knowledge and power, and the boundaries between the living and the dead. Fiction set in earlier periods, the Edwardian period in this case, likewise enables discourse on our contemporary concerns through processes of comparison, contrast, analogy, metaphor, and defamiliarization.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe Walking Med
    Subtitle of host publicationZombies and the Medical Image
    Editors Lorenzo Servitje, Sherryl Vint
    PublisherThe Pennsylvania State University Press
    Chapter3
    Pages54-70
    Number of pages17
    ISBN (Print)978-0-271-07711-6, 978-0-271-07712-3
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

    Keywords

    • Zombie concept
    • medical healing
    • health
    • Living
    • dead people

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