The development of an early warning system for determining the benefits (or diminishing returns) of increasing the length of treatment for PTSD

Tara Galovski, Matthew King, Reginald Nixon, Brian Smith, Jamie Gradus, Patricia Resick

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

Galovski et al. (2012) showed that varying the length of Cognitive Processing Therapy resulted in unheralded low rates of treatment non-response (8% versus 34% at session 12). An early warning system for distinguishing for whom added sessions is helpful and for whom there are diminishing returns is critical in reducing the risk of premature therapy termination and compromising optimal dose of therapy. Contrarily, continuing therapy with diminishing returns may prevent engagement in a different treatment with better outcomes. This study combines data from 4 CPT clinical trials (179 PTSD+ civilians) and assesses whether readily available clinical information can discriminate final treatment outcome. Patients who did not show clear, early treatment response were classified as either delayed (PTSD- by post-treatment), partial (clinically significant symptom reduction by post-treatment but PTSD+), or non-responders (no clinically significant symptom reduction).
Original languageEnglish
Pages152-153
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Event36th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies - Virtual Conference
Duration: 4 Nov 202014 Nov 2020

Conference

Conference36th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies
Period4/11/2014/11/20

Keywords

  • Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Treatment
  • Cognitive processing therapy

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