The Effect of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) on Subjective–Objective Sleep Discrepancy in Individuals with Co-Morbid Insomnia and Sleep Apnoea: A Randomised Controlled Trial

Darah-Bree Bensen-Boakes, Amal M Osman, Leon Lack, Peter Catcheside, Nick Antic, Simon S. Smith, Ching Li Chai-Coetzer, Amanda O'Grady, Nicola Dunn, Jan Robinson, R Doug McEvoy, Alexander Sweetman

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Abstract

People with insomnia frequently underestimate the duration of their sleep compared to objective polysomnography-measured sleep duration. Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the most effective treatment for insomnia and also reduces the degree of sleep underestimation. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a highly prevalent sleep disorder characterised by frequent narrowing (hypopnoea) and closure (apnoea) of the upper airway during sleep. Comorbid insomnia and sleep apnoea (COMISA) is a prevalent and debilitating disorder. No study has investigated subjectively (sleep diary) versus objectively (polysomnography) measured sleep discrepancies (SOSD) in individuals with COMISA before or following CBT-I. This randomised waitlist-controlled trial investigated SOSD in 145 participants with COMISA before and 6-weeks after CBT-I (n = 72) versus control (n = 73). All participants were studied prior to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for sleep apnoea. At baseline, participants underestimated their total sleep time (mean ± SD −51.9 ± 94.1 min) and sleep efficiency (−9.6 ± 18.3%), and overestimated sleep onset latency (34.5 ± 86.1 min; all p = < 0.001). Mixed models indicated a main effect of time on reduction of SOSD in both groups, but no between-group difference in the reduction of any SOSD parameters. These findings may indicate that untreated OSA contributes to a discrepancy between perceived and objective sleep parameters in people with COMISA that is not amenable to CBT-I alone (ACTRN12613001178730).

Original languageEnglish
Article number1787
Number of pages13
JournalApplied Sciences
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Feb 2022

Keywords

  • CBT-I
  • Obstructive sleep apnoea
  • Insomnia
  • Subjective–objective sleep discrepancy

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