The effect of digital alteration disclaimer labels on social comparison and body image: Instructions and individual differences

Belinda Bury, Marika Tiggemann, Amy Slater

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    24 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The current study aimed to investigate the effect of digital alteration disclaimer labels appended to fashion magazine advertisements, as well as instructional condition, on women's social comparison and body dissatisfaction. Participants were 378 female undergraduate students who viewed 11 thin ideal advertisements with either no disclaimer, a generic disclaimer, or a more detailed specific disclaimer. There were three instructional conditions: neutral, distractor, and social comparison. Disclaimer labels did not affect appearance comparison or body dissatisfaction, but instructional condition did, with the social comparison instructions producing the highest appearance comparison and body dissatisfaction. In addition, there was a three-way interaction with trait appearance comparison, such that women high on trait appearance comparison who saw specifically worded disclaimers in the distractor instructional condition experienced increased body dissatisfaction, whereas women low on this trait experienced decreased body dissatisfaction. It seems that both instructions and individual differences may influence responses to disclaimer labels.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)136-142
    Number of pages7
    JournalBody Image
    Volume17
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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