The effect of self-reported habitual sleep quality and sleep length on autobiographical memory

Jaap Murre, Gert Kristo, Stephanus Janssen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A large number of studies have recently shown effects of sleep on memory consolidation. In this study the effects of the sleep quality and sleep length on the retention of autobiographical memories are examined, using an Internet-based diary technique (Kristo, Janssen, & Murre, 2009). Each of over 600 participants recorded one recent personal event and was contacted after a retention interval that ranged from 2 to 46 days. Recall of the content, time, and details of the event were scored and related to sleep quality and sleep length as measured with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that poor sleep quality, but not short sleep length, was associated with significantly lower recall at the longer retention periods (30-46 days), but not at the shorter ones (2-15 days), although the difference in recall between good and poor sleepers was small.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)633-645
    Number of pages13
    JournalMemory
    Volume22
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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