The effect of wind turbine noise on polysomnographically measured and self-reported sleep latency in wind turbine noise naïve participants

Tessa Liebich, Leon Lack, Gorica Micic, Kristy Hansen, Branko Zajamšek, Claire Dunbar, Bastien Lechat, Hannah Scott, Nicole Lovato, Felix Decup, Duc Phuc Nguyen, Peter Catcheside

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Wind turbine noise (WTN) exposure could potentially interfere with the initiation of sleep. However, effects on objectively assessed sleep latency are largely unknown. This study sought to assess the impact of WTN on polysomnographically measured and sleep diary-determined sleep latency compared to control background noise alone in healthy good sleepers without habitual prior WTN exposure. METHODS: Twenty-three WTN naïve urban residents (mean ± SD age: 21.7 ± 2.1 years, range 18-29, 13 females) attended the sleep laboratory for two polysomnography studies, one week apart. Participants were blind to noise conditions and only informed that they may or may not hear noise during each night. During the sleep onset period, participants were exposed to counterbalanced nights of WTN at 33 dB(A), the upper end of expected indoor values; or background noise alone as the control condition (23 dB(A)). RESULTS: Linear mixed model analysis revealed no differences in log10 normalized objective or subjective sleep latency between the WTN versus control nights (median [interquartile range] objective 16.5 [11.0 to 18.5] vs. 16.5 [10.5 to 29.0] min, p = .401; subjective 20.0 [15.0 to 25.0] vs. 15.0 [10.0 to 30.0] min, p = .907). CONCLUSIONS: Although undetected small effects cannot be ruled out, these results do not support that WTN extends sleep latency in young urban-dwelling individuals without prior WTN exposure.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberzsab283
Number of pages11
JournalSLEEP
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • environmental noise
  • health impacts
  • perception
  • sleep
  • wind turbine noise

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