The effects of video and non-negative social feedback on distorted appraisals of bodily sensations and social anxiety

Yoshihiro Kanai, Junwen Chen, S Sasagawa, Yuji Sakano

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The effects of video feedback and nonnegative feedback from other people were examined as possibly ameliorating distorted appraisals of bodily sensations, as well as subjective and physiological anxiety in socially anxious individuals. Nonnegative feedback from a confederate emphasized the absence of negative outcomes (e.g., did not seem to tremble) rather than the presence of positive outcomes (e.g., looked calm). Socially anxious students were randomly assigned to either the experimental group, which received video and social feedback (n = 12), or the control group (n = 13). Participants were asked to give a videotaped speech twice. After the first speech, the experimental group watched the videotape of their speech and received feedback from a confederate, whereas the control group watched the video of another person's speech. The intervention improved distorted appraisal of bodily sensations and anticipatory anxiety for the experimental group. However, there were no differential effects on anxiety between the groups during speeches.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)411-427
    Number of pages17
    JournalPsychological Reports
    Volume109
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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