THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CARING: THE PATTERN IN A SOUTH AUSTRALIAN SUBURBAN POPULATION

E. Kalucy, F. Baum

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper provides a profile of a representative sample of informal carers drawn from a suburban population selected randomly from the electoral register in the inner southern area of Adelaide, South Australia. The data were collected through a mailed questionnaire survey which achieved a response rate of 71.7%. (n=1765). 13.4% (n=236) of the population defined themselves as having an unpaid carer's role. Of these 70 were resident carers and 166 non‐resident carers. Most carers were women and were significantly older than the general population. Compared with non‐resident carers, resident carers were disadvantaged in terms of income, housing, access to transport and social support, and reported significantly worse health status as indicated by a number of measures including the Nottingham Health Profile. Resident carers reported stress and restriction of activities, but also reported receiving considerable satisfaction from their caring role. The paper describes the time spent on caring and the perceived needs of the carers.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3-8
    Number of pages6
    JournalAustralian Journal on Ageing
    Volume11
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 1992

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