The experiences of remote and rural Aboriginal Health Workers and Registered Nurses who undertook a postgraduate diabetes course to improve the health of Indigenous Australians

Merilyn King, Lindy King, Eileen Willis, Rebecca Munt, Frith Semmens

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper reports on an evaluation of an educational initiative that seeks to improve the diabetes health outcomes of a vulnerable group, Indigenous Australians residing in remote and rural New South Wales. In this context seven Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs) and ten registered nurses (RNs) undertook an accredited Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA) course. The aims of this study were to identify the beliefs, attitudes and experiences of this group concerning specialist diabetes training, strategies already used by managers and those that could be used to help consolidate the diabetes expertise of AHWs and RNs. The fi ndings indicate specialist diabetes training and constructive support is required if AHWs and RNs are to develop from a novice to an expert. We concluded that the ADEA diabetes course is highly relevant to the needs of Indigenous Australians and that constructive support from managers and the university is most important in the development of diabetes expertise.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)107-117
    Number of pages11
    JournalContemporary Nurse
    Volume42
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Keywords

    • Diabetes education for Aboriginal Health Workers
    • Indigenous australians
    • Perceptions of specialist diabetes courses
    • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

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