The impact of Aboriginal status, cigarette smoking and smoking cessation on perinatal outcomes in South Australia

Nicolette A. Hodyl, Luke E. Grzeskowiak, Michael J. Stark, Wendy Scheil, Vicki L. Clifton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the impact of Aboriginal status, active cigarette smoking and smoking cessation during pregnancy on perinatal outcomes.

Design: Retrospective cohort study from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2008.

Setting: All singleton births in South Australia.

Participants: Population-based birth records of pregnancies to Aboriginal women (n = 4245) and non-Aboriginal women (n = 167 746).

Main outcome measures: Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% CIs for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes according to Aboriginal status and maternal smoking in pregnancy.

Results: Active cigarette smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes, including premature labour (Aboriginal, 1-10 cigarettes per day: aOR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.28-2.23; non-Aboriginal, 1-10 cigarettes per day: aOR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.34-1.58), preterm birth (Aboriginal, 1-10 cigarettes per day: aOR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.14-1.73; non-Aboriginal, 1-10 cigarettes per day: aOR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.39-1.57), intrauterine growth restriction (Aboriginal, 1-10 cigarettes per day: aOR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.77-3.08; non-Aboriginal, 1-10 cigarettes per day: aOR, 2.65; 95% CI, 2.48-2.83) and small for gestational age (Aboriginal, 1-10 cigarettes per day: aOR, 2.49; 95% CI, 2.06-3.00; non-Aboriginal, 1-10 cigarettes per day: aOR, 2.29; 95% CI, 2.20-2.40). For both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal women who smoked 11 or more cigarettes per day the aOR for these outcomes increased. Smoking cessation in the first trimester reduced these risks to levels comparable with non-smokers. The risk of each adverse outcome was greater in Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal women for all smoking categories; however, interactions between Aboriginal status and smoking were not significant, indicating an equal contribution of smoking to poor outcomes in both populations.

Conclusions: Smoking cessation or reduction during pregnancy would significantly improve outcomes in both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal women. This should be made a clear priority to improve pregnancy outcomes for all women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)274-278
Number of pages5
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume201
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Indigenous health
  • Aboriginal status
  • active cigarette smoking
  • smoking cessation
  • smoking cessation during pregnancy
  • perinatal outcomes
  • Aboriginal women
  • non-Aboriginal women

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The impact of Aboriginal status, cigarette smoking and smoking cessation on perinatal outcomes in South Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this