The impact of computer display height and desk design on 3D posture during information technology work by young adults

Leon Straker, Robin J. Burgess-Limerick, Clare M. Pollock, Kevin J. Murray, Kevin J. Netto, Jemma L. Coleman, Rachel Skoss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Computer display height and desk design to allow forearm support are two critical design features of workstations for information technology tasks. However there is currently no 3D description of head and neck posture with different computer display heights and no direct comparison to paper based information technology tasks. There is also inconsistent evidence on the effect of forearm support on posture and no evidence on whether these features interact. This study compared the 3D head, neck and upper limb postures of 18 male and 18 female young adults whilst working with different display and desk design conditions. There was no substantial interaction between display height and desk design. Lower display heights increased head and neck flexion with more spinal asymmetry when working with paper. The curved desk, designed to provide forearm support, increased scapula elevation/protraction and shoulder flexion/abduction.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)336-349
Number of pages14
JournalJOURNAL OF ELECTROMYOGRAPHY AND KINESIOLOGY
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

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