The Impact of Military Pediatrics: Assessing Clinical, Leadership, Academic, and Operational Experience among Pediatric-trained Graduates from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

Courtney A. Judd, Ting Dong, Holly S. Meyer, Patrick W. Hickey, Dario M. Torre, Steven J. Durning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction This article uses alumni survey data from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine to assess the professional impact of pediatric-trained USU graduates over the course of their careers. We specifically report on the clinical and leadership roles held, career accomplishments, and operational involvement among military pediatricians. Materials and Methods This study analyzed survey data that were collected from alumni of USU. We used descriptive statistics to report the career achievements and operational experiences among USU graduates who completed training in pediatrics. This study was deemed exempt by the USU Institutional Review Board. Results The survey response rate was 49.5% among 2,400 eligible respondents. Out of 1,189 alumni respondents, 110 (9.3%) trained in pediatrics. Among the pediatric-trained USU graduates, 98.2% spent some time as a full-time clinician, 73.6% served as chief of a clinical service, 42.7% held the role of department chair/chief or the equivalent, and 26.3% filled leadership positions in deployed settings. Forty percent of USU-trained military pediatricians deployed to combat areas at least once, and 35.5% participated in at least one peacetime humanitarian mission. Conclusions Our findings contribute to the unique story of military pediatricians who graduated from USU. These uniformed pediatricians participate actively in all realms of military medicine and have demonstrated their versatility through participation in a wide variety of vital functions. Their contributions include the provision of clinical care for both military children and active duty service members, serving in varied leadership positions, engaging in health professions education and other academic pursuits, and participating in operational assignments. Future studies could aim to more fully address the diverse contributions of military pediatricians to the overall mission by including more specific data about career experiences from all uniformed pediatricians.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e1584-e1589
Number of pages6
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume185
Issue number9-10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • child
  • health occupations
  • military personnel
  • pediatrics
  • schools
  • medical
  • pursuit eye movement
  • pediatricians

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