The impact of workplace culture on the accountability of mental health nurses to involve consumers in care planning: A focused ethnography

Josephien H.M. Rio, Jeffrey Fuller, Kerry Taylor, Eimear Muir-Cochrane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Recovery-oriented mental health practice guidelines recommend regular consumer involvement in care plans, yet in many acute settings, these are not routinely created thereby compromising accountability. This study explored the impact of workplace culture on the capacity of mental health nurses to involve consumers in care planning and consequently to work accountably. A focused ethnography was undertaken in one Australian inpatient unit involving mental health nurses and other health professionals. Data were derived from in-depth semistructured interviews with 12 nurses and 6 months of nonparticipant observation of multidisciplinary meetings and clinical handovers. Workplace culture had an impact on mental health nurses' accountability practices. A culture that prioritized reduction in length of stay resulted in less recovery-oriented care. Health professionals who paid more attention to crisis and risk management resulted in fewer opportunities for consumer-involved care planning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-262
Number of pages8
JournalNursing and Health Sciences
Volume23
Issue number1
Early online date2 Jan 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • accountable
  • consumer participation
  • mental health services
  • patient care planning
  • risk management workplace culture, recovery

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