The incidence of preeclampsia and eclampsia and associated maternal mortality in Australia from population-linked datasets: 2000-2008

Charlene Thornton, Hannah Dahlen, Andrew Korda, Annemarie Hennessy

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    68 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To determine the incidence of preeclampsia and eclampsia and associated mortality in Australia between 2000 and 2008. Study design: Analysis of statutorily collected datasets of singleton births in New South Wales using International Classification of Disease coding. Analyzed using cross tabulation, logistic regression, and means testing, where appropriate. Results: The overall incidence of preeclampsia was 3.3% with a decrease from 4.6% to 2.3%. The overall rate of eclampsia was 8.6/10,000 births or 2.6% of preeclampsia cases, with an increase from 2.3% to 4.2%. The relative risk of eclampsia in preeclamptic women in 2008 was 1.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.28-2.92) when compared with the year 2000. The relative risk of a woman with preeclampsia/eclampsia dying in the first 12 months following birth compared with normotensive women is 5.1 (95% confidence interval, 3.07-8.60). Conclusion: Falling rates of preeclampsia have not equated to a decline in the incidence of eclampsia. An accurate rate of both preeclampsia and eclampsia is vital considering the considerable contribution that these diseases make to maternal mortality. The identification and treatment of eclampsia should remain a priority in the clinical setting.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)476.e1-476.e5
    Number of pages5
    JournalAMERICAN JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY
    Volume208
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

    Keywords

    • eclampsia
    • incidence
    • maternal mortality
    • preeclampsia

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