The influence of ASD disclosure and its timing upon impressions formed during police interviewing

Katie Logos, Neil Brewer, Robyn L. Young

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) sometimes exhibit unusual behaviors that may lead to adverse interactions with criminal justice professionals and create unfavorable juror impressions. In two previous mock-police interview experiments we found support for this notion. There were more negative impressions and guilty verdicts when observers viewed a suspect displaying characteristic ASD behaviors compared to neurotypical behaviors. The present study found labeling the suspect and providing brief ASD information reduced this negative behavioral effect. The reduction was greater when labeling occurred before viewing the interview compared to after. When found guilty, ASD labeling decreased impressions of suspect criminal responsibility.
Original languageEnglish
Pages134
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2020
EventAmerican Psychology-Law Society Annual Conference 2020 - New Orleans, United States
Duration: 5 Mar 20207 Mar 2020

Conference

ConferenceAmerican Psychology-Law Society Annual Conference 2020
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans
Period5/03/207/03/20

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
  • Criminal justice
  • Interviews
  • Juror decisions
  • Suspects

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