The influence of travelling to hospital by ambulance on reperfusion time and outcomes for patients with STEMI

Eleanor Redwood, Karice Hyun, John K. French, Leonard Kritharides, Mark Ryan, Derek P. Chew, Mario D'Souza, David B. Brieger

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In Australia, an estimated 12.7% of patients with ST‐elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) die or have recurrent myocardial infarctions within 30 days of diagnosis.1 Prompt reperfusion reduces morbidity and mortality, and guidelines consequently aim to minimise the time between symptom onset and reperfusion.1-3 Patients with chest pain may arrange their own transport to an emergency department or travel by ambulance. The risk period is shorter for patients without access to a defibrillator when they travel by ambulance, and they receive initial management more promptly. In Australia, only one in two patients with STEMI calls an ambulance.4 Characterising patients less likely to call an ambulance would inform targeted public health efforts to improve this situation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-378
Number of pages2
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume214
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2021

Keywords

  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Emergency medical services
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Transportation of patients

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